The Royal Pavilion: A Whimsical Wonderland

East elevation of The Royal Pavilion. / Source: www.brightonmuseums.org

East elevation of The Royal Pavilion. / Source: www.brightonmuseums.org

While writing my novella Masquerade Melody, I had the fun task of researching a new-to-me historical landmark—the whimsical Royal Pavilion!

The Royal Pavilion is a former royal residence located in Brighton, England which can still be enjoyed by visitors today! Beginning in 1787, it was built in stages as a seaside retreat for George, Prince of Wales, who became the Prince Regent in 1811. The current appearance of the Pavilion with its exotic domes and minarets is the work of architect John Nash who extended the building, starting in 1815 and ending in 1823.

Queen Victoria visited the Pavilion after ascending the throne in 1837, and she was none too impressed with her uncle’s decadent palace. After just two return visits, the Queen resolved to sell the Royal Pavilion in the late 1840’s. When the opportunity arose to acquire the Pavilion, leading figures in the town recognized the importance of the structure to Brighton’s history and economy. The building was purchased by the town of Brighton in 1850 for £53,000 and remains to this day the only royal palace not owned by the state or the Crown.

Let’s take a brief cyber-tour of this singularly unique British landmark as it stands today!

A Whimsical Wonderland

Upon entering the Royal Pavilion, we pass through a porte-cochere and then the Octagon Hall.

Octagon Hall at The Royal Pavilion in Brighton, England. / Source: Pinterest

Octagon Hall at The Royal Pavilion in Brighton, England. / Source: Pinterest

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