Queen Elizabeth’s Hats on Parade

Queen Elizabeth II on July 16, 2015 in Barking, England. / Source: Max Mumby, Indigo, Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth, July 16, 2015 in Barking, England. / Source: Max Mumby, Indigo, Getty Images

When I contemplate my fashion inspirations, three things immediately spring to mind: the ever elegant Audrey Hepburn, every Victorian lady who ever donned a House of Worth gown, and Queen Elizabeth II.

Queen Elizabeth’s fashion sense is timeless. Classic and feminine. Individual and iconic. The gloves, the jewels, the perfectly coordinated monochromatic ensembles, all worn with an air of grace and poise—and one, solitary, black patent purse.

While I admire every facet of the Queen’s style, my favorite has to be her seemingly endless hat collection. One that has been honored by the highest millinery authority. That’s right, dears. In 2014, Queen Elizabeth II was inducted into The Headwear Association Hall of Fame, the oldest trade association in the fashion industry, established in 1908. Talk about major #HatGoals!

Since this month marks the Queen’s 91st birthday (April 21), I thought it would be fun to celebrate by highlighting a selection of her many millinery masterpieces. Gather round old-fashioned fashionistas, it’s time for haute couture hats to go on parade!

Queen Elizabeth’s Hats on Parade

Queen Elizabeth attending a Garden Party at Balmoral Castle on August 7, 2012. / Source: Pinterest

The Queen attending a Garden Party at Balmoral Castle on August 7, 2012. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth attending the Trooping the Colour on June 15, 2013. / Source: Zimbo.com

Queen Elizabeth attending the Trooping the Colour on June 15, 2013. / Source: Zimbo

The first hat to march in our parade is a Diagonal Crown Hat, a style also affectionately known as the “Ski Slope” hat. This particular example is trimmed in cobalt lace that provides a brilliant contrast against the white base and echoes the color of the ensemble. Simply beautiful!

Queen Elizabeth II / Source: Chris Jackson at Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth II / Source: Chris Jackson at Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth II / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth II / Source: Pinterest

This Diagonal Crown Hat was designed by esteemed milliner, Rachel Trevor Morgan, who also creates pieces for Duchess Catherine Middleton. I love how the subtle, cream and pastel green pinstripe gives the hat depth and plays off the pop of forest green cording. A prefect hat to don on St. Patrick’s Day!

Queen Elizabeth visits the National Theatre to commemorate the institution’s 50th anniversary on October 22, 2013 in London, England. / Source: Getty Images Europe

Queen Elizabeth visits the National Theatre to commemorate the institution’s 50th anniversary on October 22, 2013 in London, England. / Source: Getty Images Europe

Queen Elizabeth visits the National Theatre to commemorate the institution’s 50th anniversary on October 22, 2013 in London, England. / Source: Bauer Griffin

Queen Elizabeth visits the National Theatre to commemorate the institution’s 50th anniversary on October 22, 2013 in London, England. / Source: Bauer Griffin

Queen Elizabeth visits the National Theatre to commemorate the institution’s 50th anniversary on October 22, 2013 in London, England. / Source: Bauer Griffin

Queen Elizabeth visits the National Theatre to commemorate the institution’s 50th anniversary on October 22, 2013 in London, England. / Source: Bauer Griffin

Yet again, the Queen favors a Diagonal Crown Hat. However, on this occasion a sassy shade of hot pink and matching powder-fluff of feathers makes a bold statement. “I am Queen. And I am FABULOUS!”

Queen Elizabeth visits Royal Holloway at University Of London on March 14, 2014 in Egham, England. / Source: Chris Jackson, Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth visits Royal Holloway at University Of London on March 14, 2014 in Egham, England. / Source: Chris Jackson, Getty Images

I am of the opinion that blue is the Queen’s best color, and this bright shade of turquoise only serves to convince me of the validity of this belief. How it draws attention to her blue eyes and makes them sparkle! And this particular Hourglass Hat with the bow is just darling!

Queen Elizabeth leaves Sandringham Church after traditional Christmas Day service at on December 25, 2011 in King's Lynn, England. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth leaves Sandringham Church after traditional Christmas Day service at on December 25, 2011 in King’s Lynn, England. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth leaves Sandringham Church after traditional Christmas Day service at on December 25, 2011 in King's Lynn, England. / Source: Chris Jackson, Getty Image Europe

Queen Elizabeth leaves Sandringham Church after traditional Christmas Day service at on December 25, 2011 in King’s Lynn, England. / Source: Chris Jackson, Getty Image Europe

Next to walk in our parade is the hat I believe would me most becoming . . . on myself. Because a girl can dream . . . and ought to dream . . . and oh, just LOOK. AT. IT!!! This white cloche with lavender tweed is most assuredly dreaming of springtime! *le sigh*

Queen Elizabeth visits Macartin’s Cathedral in Enniskillen Northern Ireland during her Diamond Jubilee tour in June of 2012. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth visits Macartin’s Cathedral in Enniskillen Northern Ireland during her Diamond Jubilee tour in June of 2012. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth visits Macartin’s Cathedral in Enniskillen Northern Ireland during her Diamond Jubilee tour in June of 2012. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth visits Macartin’s Cathedral in Enniskillen Northern Ireland during her Diamond Jubilee tour in June of 2012. / Source: Pinterest

If one were to compare a hat with Fine China, then one would most certainly dub this powder blue number a piece of Wedgwood jasperware. The classic shape and dainty trim give this millinery masterpiece a simplified elegance. One perfectly suited for afternoon tea. I’ll ring for Harrison to bring a pot of Darjeeling and strawberry scones with clotted cream. *rings silver bell*

Queen Elizabeth leaves Moorfields Eye Hospital after the opening of a new Children's Eye Centre on February 23, 2007 in London, England. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth leaves Moorfields Eye Hospital after the opening of a new Children’s Eye Centre on February 23, 2007 in London, England. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth leaves Moorfields Eye Hospital after the opening of a new Children's Eye Centre on February 23, 2007 in London, England. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth leaves Moorfields Eye Hospital after the opening of a new Children’s Eye Centre on February 23, 2007 in London, England. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth leaves Moorfields Eye Hospital after the opening of a new Children's Eye Centre on February 23, 2007 in London, England. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth leaves Moorfields Eye Hospital after the opening of a new Children’s Eye Centre on February 23, 2007 in London, England. / Source: Pinterest

Here comes another Diagonal Crown Hat, marching along the parade route! This one is fashioned in a regal shade of purple and features a satiny black flower. Paired with the tweed coat, it makes for a perfect winter ensemble!

Queen Elizabeth II pictured on November 22, 2011 by WPA Pool. / Source: Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth II pictured on November 22, 2011 by WPA Pool. / Source: Getty Images

This Diagonal Crown piece by Rachel Trevor Morgan is the ballerina of hats. From the romantic hue of blush pink, to the exquisitely feminine design that stars a glittering prima brooch and corps de spray of feathers, this piece is on pointe!

Queen Elizabeth welcoming the Emir of Qatar to England, October 2010. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth welcoming the Emir of Qatar to England, October 2010. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth welcoming the Emir of Qatar to England, October 2010. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth welcoming the Emir of Qatar to England, October 2010. / Source: Pinterest

Next we have a Split Crown Hat with short, cartwheel brims designed by milliner Angela Kelly. The crimson color immediately brings to mind a tube of classic, red lip-stick. Bold, yet utterly feminine!

Queen Elizabeth attends the Royal Maundy Service at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle on March 24, 2016 in Windsor, England. / Source: Max Mumby, Indigo, Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth attends the Royal Maundy Service at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle on March 24, 2016 in Windsor, England. / Source: Max Mumby, Indigo, Getty Images

I love the contrast on this Flat Brim Hat between the bright turquoise base and the dark navy lace trim! It makes a definite statement without overwhelming the eye. And of course, the Queen pairs it with her signature, black patent handbag.

Queen Elizabeth attends Maundy Thursday service at Christ Church Cathedral in Oxford, England on March 28, 2013. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth attends Maundy Thursday service at Christ Church Cathedral in Oxford, England on March 28, 2013. / Source: Pinterest

Queen Elizabeth II / Source: Chris Jackson, Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth II / Source: Chris Jackson, Getty Images

To bring our parade to an end, I give thee this sapphire showstopper! Designed by Angela Kelly, this Tear Drop Crown Hat is unique in shape and classic in trimming with its single monochromatic feather. A millinery masterpiece that once again confirms my love of the Queen in blue!

Bonus Fashion Fact: That brooch photographed with the Tear Drop hat is a piece of Victorian history! The sapphire brooch, surrounded by 12 diamonds, was a gift from Prince Albert to Queen Victoria the day before their wedding on February 9, 1840. Victoria wore it on her big day and then constantly while Prince Albert was alive. Her daughter-in-law Queen Alexandra wore it at her coronation, and then it was passed to Queen Elizabeth in the year of her accession.

Which of the Queen’s hats is your favorite? I’d love to gush about millinery fashions with you in the comments section below! To enjoy more royal photos and some fanciful fascinators, pop over to Pinterest where I have boards for The British Monarchy and Millinery Masterpieces.

10 thoughts on “Queen Elizabeth’s Hats on Parade

  1. I have LONG wished to be able to go to the Queen’s milliner and say, “Make me some luscious hats with suits to match; money is no object.”
    I must confess, I am a peculiar mix of Southern lady from the true deep south, Seer Prophet Watchman, thoroughbred racehorse, battle-warrior with a serious majority of proper Victorian lady.
    I do not like the modern steampunk. But I do enjoy your posts immensely and our mutual love of all things Victorian. :)

    • Good day, Donna! Thank you so much for popping by and leaving a comment. :-)

      It would be incredible to own a hat designed by one of the Queen’s favorite milliners! My dream hat would be a turquoise cloche.

  2. Please inform on the hatpins. Back in the day, my Grandmother used a long hat pin to, I believe, catch a bit of hair to secure her hat. How do the Queen’s hat pins actually work? I notice color-coordinated ones one both sides of many of her hats. Just curious. Thank you.

    • Good day, Deb! Thanks so much for popping by and commenting. :-)

      That is a great question! You’re correct in guessing how hatpins work. In short, the purpose of a hatpin is to secure a hat to the head via a metal pin that sticks into one’s hair, which is preferably styled in a gathered, up-do of some sort. I shall have to do some more research as to their origins/history. Sounds like a good topic for a future blog post, so stay tuned! :-)

  3. Utterly impossible to choose a favourite! I LOVE them all… Never met a hat I didn’t like… many that didn’t look good on ME, but loved the hat nonetheless.. :o)

    • Good day, Toni! Thanks so much for stopping by and leaving a comment. :-)
      Oh, how I wish I could take you shopping to find your perfect hat match! I truly believe that anyone can look great in a hat. It’s simply a matter of finding the right style of hat that compliments your unique facial proportions, hair cut, and individual fashion sensibilities.

      • Oh, I have several hats, and love them dearly… I have difficulty finding ones that FIT though… The “one size fits all” hats that are generally available here in the U.S. don’t fit me.. I look like Stan Laurel with his itty bitty Derby hat… Occasionally I find one that I like AND fits…. more often than not, that hat goes home with me! Lol….

        • Oh, good! I’m glad you’ve found some millinery masterpieces to gladden your hat loving heart! :-)
          LOL! That mental image of Stan Laurel made me smile. I’d love to one day acquire a Derby hat for my growing collection!

  4. Re: Hatpins — Queen Elizabeth’s hair is short, so the hats can’t only be held on by the hatpins that we can see. I’ve searched in vain for a solid answer to this question: how does she anchor the hatpins? A discussion amongst friends turned up two possible solutions:
    1: tiny ponytails under the hat, through which the hatpin can pass, like chignons for those with much longer hair
    2: wig clips, which would work rather like the tiny ponytail option, allowing the hatpin to go between the clip and the scalp and not slip out.

    • Good day, Cynthia! Thank you ever so for popping by the comment section. :-)
      You make a very valid point. While I know how hat pins traditionally functioned on the long locks of a Victorian lady, I’m not quite certain how one would use them with today’s shorter hair styles. (I have short hair myself, but none of my hats require the use of hat pins.) Your ideas for how the Queen might make them work sound like good possibilities. I shall have to do some research and if I find any solid answers, write a blog update!

Leave a Reply to admin Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>